If assessments are diagnoses, what are the prescriptions?

I happen to like statistics. I appreciate qualitative observations, too– data of all sorts can be deeply illuminating. But I also believe that the most important part of interpreting them is understanding what they do and don’t measure. And in terms of policy, it’s important to consider what one will do with the data once collected, organized, analyzed, and interpreted. What do the data tell us that we didn’t know before? Now that we have this knowledge, how will we apply it to achieve the desired change?

In an eloquent, impassioned open letter to President Obama, Education Secretary Arne Duncan, Bill Gates and other billionaires pouring investments into business-driven education reforms (revised version at Washington Post), elementary teacher and literacy coach Peggy Robertson argues that all these standardized tests don’t give her more information than what she already knew from observing her students directly. She also argues that the money that would go toward administering all these tests would be better spent on basic resources such as stocking school libraries with books for the students and reducing poverty.

She doesn’t go so far as to question the current most-talked-about proposals for using those test data: performance-based pay, tenure, and firing decisions. But I will. I can think of a much more immediate and important use for the streams of data many are proposing on educational outcomes and processes: Use them to improve teachers’ professional development, not just to evaluate, reward and punish them.

Simply put, teachers deserve formative assessment too.

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Diluting the meaning of “highly qualified” teachers

Valerie Strauss posts:

Senators have included in key legislation language that would allow teachers still in training to be considered “highly qualified” so they can meet a standard set in the federal No Child Left Behind law.

In an era when the education mantra is that all kids deserve great teachers, some members of Congress want it to be the law of the land that a neophyte teacher who has demonstrated “satisfactory progress” toward full state certification is “highly qualified.”

Is it just me, or have I been transported to 1984? The original definition of “highly qualified teacher” in No Child Left Behind already represented what in most high-achieving countries would be a bare minimum qualification for beginning a teaching residency. Allowing teachers-in-training to be classified as “highly qualified” seems ridiculous on its face.

Strauss sees this as a giveaway to political darling Teach for America:

Teachers still in training programs are disproportionately concentrated in schools serving low-income students and students of color, the very children who need the very best the teaching profession has to offer. In California alone, nearly a quarter of such teachers work in schools with 98-100 percent of minority students, while some affluent districts have none. Half of California’s teachers still in training teach special education.

Allowing non-certified teachers to be considered “highly qualified” would be a gift to programs such as Teach for America, which gives newly graduated college students from elite institutions five weeks of summer training before sending them into low-performing schools.

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