Some limitations of value-added modeling

Following this discussion on teacher evaluation led me to a fascinating analysis by Jim Manzi.

We’ve already discussed some concerns with using standardized test scores as the outcome measures in value-added modeling; Manzi points out other problems with the model and the inputs to the model.

  1. Teaching is complex.
  2. It’s difficult to make good predictions about achievement across different domains.
  3. It’s unrealistic to attribute success or failure only to a single teacher.
  4. The effects of teaching extend beyond one school year, and therefore measurements capture influences that go back beyond one year and one teacher.

I’m not particularly fond of the above list—while I agree with all the claims, they’re not explained very clearly and they don’t capture the below key issues, which he discusses in more depth.

  1. Inferences about the aggregate are not inferences about an individual.
  2. More deeply, the model is valid at the aggregate level, “but any one data point cannot be validated.” This is a fundamental problem, true of stereotypes, of generalizations, and of averages. While they may enable you to make broad claims about a population of people, you can’t apply those claims to policies about a particular individual with enough confidence to justify high-stakes outcomes such as firing decisions. As Manzi summarizes it, an evaluation system works to help an organization achieve an outcome, not to be fair to the individuals within that organization.

    This is also related to problems with data mining—by throwing a bunch of data into a model and turning the crank, you can end up with all kinds of difficult-to-interpret correlations which are excellent predictors but which don’t make a whole lot of sense from a theoretical standpoint.

  3. Basing decisions on single instead of multiple measures is flawed.
  4. From a statistical modeling perspective, it’s easier to work with a single precise, quantitative measure than with multiple measures. But this inflates the influence of that one measure, which is often limited in time and scale. Figuring out how to combine multiple measures into a single metric requires subjective judgment (and thus organizational agreement), and, in Manzi’s words, “is very unlikely to work” with value-added modeling. (I do wish he’d expanded on this point further, though.)

  5. All assessments are proxies.
  6. If the proxy is given more value than the underlying phenomenon it’s supposed to measure, this can incentivize “teaching to the test”. With much at stake, some people will try to game the system. This may motivate those who construct and rely on the model to periodically change the metrics, but that introduces more instability in interpreting and calibrating the results across implementations.

In highlighting these weaknesses of value-added modeling, Manzi concludes by arguing that improving teacher evaluation requires a lot more careful interpretation of its results, within the context of better teacher management. I would very much welcome hearing more dialogue about what that management and leadership should look like, instead of so much hype about impressive but complex statistical tools expected to solve the whole problem on their own.

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About Ming Ling
I’m an educator and researcher (trained as a cognitive scientist) who is passionate about understanding and improving how people learn. In my professional and personal lives, I seek to integrate research on learning with real-life practices that actually make a difference in how learning happens.

One Response to Some limitations of value-added modeling

  1. Pingback: Look for the story behind the numbers, not the numbers alone « Real Learning Matters

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